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Advancement Project

Advancement Project is a next generation, multi-racial, policy, communications, and legal action group committed to civil rights and racial justice.

+ Support Campaign
Causes
Voter Mobilization
Voter Protection
Budget
$7,230,000
Location
Washington
,  
D.C.
Established
1999
EIN
95-4835230
Area Served
National
Values
Community, Duty, Empowerment, Justice, Liberty
foundations supporters
Ford Foundation
1936
W.K. Kellogg Foundation
1930
Open Society Foundation
1979
Leadership
Judith Browne Dianis
Executive Director
A graduate of Columbia University School of Law and a recipient of the distinguished Skadden Fellowship, Judith Browne Dianis began her civil rights career at the NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund, Inc. (LDF), practicing law in the areas of housing, education, employment and voting rights. In its 30th Anniversary issue, Essence magazine named Browne Dianis one of “30 Women to Watch” and, in the same issue, featured her in an article defining the Black agenda for the millennium.
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Director
Roger Scott
Roger executes projects with branding and storytelling at the forefront. For the past 15 years, he’s created content that’s helped Nike and Boeing bring to life visions and digital strategies for their brands; he’s imagined customer journeys for Jawbone, LVMH, and Intel; and he’s designed product experiences for Sony and Nest.

The impact of your support

Advancement Project’s Power and Democracy program builds upon our past successes in staving off voter suppression schemes while looking for opportunities to expand the power of the electorate. 

With your support, we can:

  • Defeat federal and local policies that make it harder to vote; 
  • Hold local and state election officials accountable state by state; 
  • Expand the electorate through eliminating criminal convictions as a barrier to voting and restoring voting rights to people with felony convictions;
  • Train voter protection advocates in key states to build up the next generation voting rights movement; and
  • Conduct polling and strategic messaging for young people of color to get out the vote.

Why this work is important

2020 is a crucial year in fighting for our democracy with a presidential election, a large number of congressional seats up for election, and the census that will impact representation for all, especially communities of color. We are up against the most vicious backlash we have experienced in decades—from the constant attacks on the immigrant community, to the criminalization of communities of color, to the increasingly cynical rhetoric to suppress the vote. Left unchecked, these attacks could validate additional state and federal restrictions on voting by vilifying voters of color; lead to an intentional lack of oversight of discriminatory voting practices at both the state and federal level; and mean the further gutting of the Voting Rights Act and National Voter Registration Act that has allowed states to ignore the previously protected Right To Vote. Meanwhile, mass incarceration has left millions out of our democracy, creating barriers to affordable housing, good jobs and even the voting process.

Our track record

Advancement Project works to ensure fair elections that encourage equal opportunity for full civic engagement and representation for all, especially those in historically disenfranchised communities. For almost 20 years, we have fought voter suppression to ensure that all have equal access to the democratic process. Building power in communities of color in all aspects is integral to ensuring a free and safe future for all. Our programs center on inequity issues that are entry points for communities of color to vote, transform institutions and hold stakeholders accountable. Our achievements include:

  • Successfully challenged Voter ID laws in Pennsylvania and Missouri;
  • Beat back monster voter suppression law and voter ID in North Carolina;
  • Part of coalition to restore voting rights to 1.4 million people with felonies in Florida; and
  • Successful campaigns with partners to restore voting rights in Louisiana (70,000 voters) and Virginia (150,000 voters).

Impact Updates
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